Italian Focaccia

Italian Focaccia. A bread that is known and liked all over the world. Focaccia is a flat bread, Italian bread baked in the oven, which is very similar in texture and style to Pizza. The first confirmation of the word focaccia appears in 1300. In Ancient Rome, called panis focacius was a flat bread baked in a hearth. The word comes from the Latin hearth “hearth, place of baking“. The basic recipe is believed to have originated from the Etruscans, but today it is widely associated with Ligurian cuisine.
I love good focaccia. Great dough a little thicker than pizza dough, olive oil, rosemary and salt.
The flavors combine beautifully with each other and it is one of my favorite things that I eat as an appetizer or alone and of course everyone likes it.
Wanting to make a Focaccia after many attempts in the past, some with success and others without the right result, I thought of experimenting a bit not with the appearance, not with the baking but mainly with the process.
Usually when I was making a focaccia, I just kneaded the dough, left it to r
est for 1 hour and baked it.
The result is usually mediocre but tasty.
I thought that in focaccia we add dried tomatoes, salt and rosemary, without thinking that we can work other variations.
So I made this focaccia, without dried tomatoes and rosemary, but I replaced them with onions and basil.
I replaced the flour for all uses with type 00 flour. I removed the bench mixer and the dough was made by hand.
Baking time reduced by 15 ‘
The big difference was in the rest times.
Kneading and 1 hour rest, light kneading and 1 hour rest, kneading and 1 hour rest.
A total of 3 hours of rest from 1 hour that I was used to.
The result is extremely amazing.
A much more fluffy focaccia emerged and the most important thing is that after 3-4 days it is still quite fluffy.
There is also the theory that 4 hours of rest are needed, which I will try in the near future

 

 

 

 

chicken stock

CHICKEN STOCK

chicken stock

chicken stock

CHICKEN STOCK
Makes about 2.5 kg
3.5 kg chicken necks and backs
1 white onion, diced 5 cm (2 inches)
1 celery stalk, diced 5 cm (2 inches)
5 sprigs thyme
Put the chicken necks and backs in a large pot. Cover generously with cold water. Drain
and discard the water. Repeat the rinsing process two times. After the third rinse, drain and
cover with cold water. Heat over medium heat and bring to a simmer. Skim and discard
any impurities that may rise to the surface. Add the onion, celery, and thyme to the pot and
turn the heat to low. Continue to simmer the stock, skimming occasionally, for 6 hours.
Strain the stock through a chinois. Reserve in an airtight container, refrigerated, for up to 3
days, or frozen for up to 1 month.

white-balsamic-vinaigrette

WHITE BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE

white-balsamic-vinaigrette

white-balsamic-vinaigrette

WHITE BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE
Makes about 265 g
195 g olive oil
65 g white balsamic vinegar
8 g salt
Combine the ingredients in a mixing bowl and whisk until fully emulsified. Reserve the
vinaigrette in an airtight container, refrigerated, for up to 1 week

PICKLED NECTARINES

DUCK-Roasted-with-Νectarines-Chamomile-and-Amaranthus.j

PICKLED NECTARINES
Makes about 10 pieces
1 apricot
150 g
White Balsamic Pickling Liquid
Using a mandoline, thinly slice opposing sides of the nectarine to form shaved rounds.
Submerge the nectarine shaves in the pickling liquid and refrigerate overnight.

LEMON OIL

lemon oil.

lemon oil.

LEMON OIL
Makes about 350 g
400 g grapeseed oil
45 g grated lemon zest (from about 15 lemons)
Prepare an ice bath. Combine the oil and zest in a bain-marie. Cover tightly with plastic
wrap and place in a large pot filled halfway with water. Heat the pot over low heat and
bring the water temperature to 91°C/195°F, just under a simmer. Cook the oil in the water
bath for 1½ hours. Remove the bain-marie from the water bath and chill over the ice bath
until cold. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Strain the oil through a chinois, discarding the
zest. Reserve the lemon oil in an airtight container, refrigerated, for up to 1 week.

BROWN BUTTER

brown butter

brown butter

BROWN BUTTER
Makes about 680 g
1 kg butter, cubed
Heat the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. As the butter melts and starts to
foam, whisk occasionally to evenly cook. Turn the heat to low and continue to whisk
occasionally to prevent burning. Cook until the butter turns dark brown and has a nutty
aroma, about 30 minutes. Immediately strain the butter through a coffee filter, discarding
the solids. Let cool to room temperature and reserve in an airtight container, refrigerated,
for up to 1 week, or frozen for up to 1 month.

CHICKEN JUS

chicken jus

chicken jus

CHICKEN JUS
Makes about 1 kg
24 g grapeseed oil
1½ carrots, peeled and chopped

1½ onions, chopped
2 celery stalks, chopped
30 g tomato paste
1.25 kg dry red wine
7 kg chicken wings
2 kg chicken legs
500 g chicken feet
Preheat the oven to 245°C/475°F. Heat the oil in a large pot over high heat. When the oil
just starts to smoke, add the carrots, onions, and celery and cook, stirring occasionally,
until the vegetables are softened and browned, about 12 minutes. Add the tomato paste
and continue to cook, stirring frequently until well toasted, about 5 minutes. Add the wine
and deglaze the pan, scraping up any bits that may have stuck to the bottom of the pot.
Bring the wine to a simmer and reduce by half. Remove the pot from heat and set aside.
Spread the chicken wings and legs in a single layer on four unlined baking sheets. Roast in
the oven until caramelized and deep brown, about 45 minutes. Drain and discard any
rendered fat. Scrape the wings and legs into a clean large pot. Add the chicken feet and
enough cold water to generously cover. Heat over high heat and bring to a simmer. Skim
and discard any impurities that may rise to the surface. Turn the heat to low and add the
cooked vegetable mixture to the pot. Continue to simmer, skimming occasionally, for 8
hours. Strain the jus through a chinois and transfer to a clean large saucepan. Bring to a
simmer over medium heat. Turn the heat to low and gently simmer until reduced to 1 kg.
Reserve in an airtight container, refrigerated, for up to 1 week.

CHAMOMILE SIMPLE SYRUP

chamomile syrup

chamomile syrup

CHAMOMILE SIMPLE SYRUP
Makes about 125 g
140 g Simple Syrup
3 g dried chamomile
Heat the syrup in a saucepan over medium heat and bring to a simmer. Remove the pan
from the heat and stir in the chamomile. Cover and let steep at room temperature for 7
minutes. Strain the syrup through a coffee filter. Let cool to room temperature. Reserve the
syrup in an airtight container, refrigerated, for up to 5 days.

SIMPLE SYRUP

simple syrup

simple syrup

SIMPLE SYRUP
Makes about 400 g
200 g sugar
200 g water
Heat the water and sugar to a simmer in a saucepan over high heat, whisking to dissolve
the sugar. Let the syrup cool to room temperature and reserve in an airtight container,
refrigerated, for up to 1 month.